Digital satellite viewers lose free channels

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net1

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Talk of the BBC's move to put its channels "in the clear" on digital satellite, leading to the creation of a free alternative to Sky's pay-TV service, would seem to be a little premature.
The BBC channels will be broadcast in the clear on digital satellite from next Thursday, when the corporation removes its services from BSkyB's encryption system.

From that date, customers who buy a digital satellite set-top box will be able to watch the eight BBC TV channels and listen to 11 radio services without needing a Solus card, which provides access to all free-to-air channels broadcast via BSkyB's encryption system.

But they will not be able to watch ITV, ITV2, Channel 4 or Channel Five, which will remain encrypted by BSkyB.

This is because the BBC has already stopped paying Sky to distribute Solus cards to digital satellite viewers who only want to receive free channels.

Digital satellite viewers who have been sent a free-to-air card but have not yet activated it should do so before July 9 or risk it not working, a BBC spokesman said.

ITV, Channel 4 and Five have said they will not be stepping in to pay for the cost of the Solus cards, which cost about £12 each.

There are an estimated 660,000 digital satellite box owners currently using Solus cards, which means the BBC has spent nearly £8m since BSkyB launched its digital satellite service in 1998.

To get the advertiser-funded free services in the future, digital satellite viewers will either have to pay for a Sky Digital subscription or switch back to the analogue terrestrial signal they receive via an aerial.

"Solus cards are distributed by Sky on fair, reasonable and non-discriminatory terms as part of our conditional access commitment," a BSkyB spokesman said.

"If another terrestrial broadcaster wishes to take up funding the cards, Sky will continue to distribute them," he added.

BSkyB is also in the process of sending out upgraded encryption cards to all its customers and phasing out the current generation, including the Solus cards.

"No date has been set [for the switchover to the new cards], but we are in the process of sending out the new ones," the BSkyB spokesman said.

So within a few months the 660,000 digital satellite box owners who currently watch free-to-air channels with a Solus card will also lose the ITV services, Channel 4 and Five.

Last month the independent television commission chief executive, Patricia Hodgson, predicted the BBC's "in the clear" move would revolutionise the UK broadcasting landscape, creating a free-to-air alternative on digital satellite to BSkyB's subscription offering.

But it now looks as if the Solus card issue has rendered this prediction premature.

Digital satellite viewers wanting to see ITV, Channel 4 and Five may have to wait until these broadcasters renegotiate their encryption deals with BSkyB in the coming years if they decide to follow the BBC and go in the clear.

Five renewed its digital satellite encryption deal only last week.
 
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#2
net1 said:
Talk of the BBC's move to put its channels "in the clear" on digital satellite, leading to the creation of a free alternative to Sky's pay-TV service, would seem to be a little premature.
The BBC channels will be broadcast in the clear on digital satellite from next Thursday, when the corporation removes its services from BSkyB's encryption system.

From that date, customers who buy a digital satellite set-top box will be able to watch the eight BBC TV channels and listen to 11 radio services without needing a Solus card, which provides access to all free-to-air channels broadcast via BSkyB's encryption system.

But they will not be able to watch ITV, ITV2, Channel 4 or Channel Five, which will remain encrypted by BSkyB.

This is because the BBC has already stopped paying Sky to distribute Solus cards to digital satellite viewers who only want to receive free channels.

Digital satellite viewers who have been sent a free-to-air card but have not yet activated it should do so before July 9 or risk it not working, a BBC spokesman said.

ITV, Channel 4 and Five have said they will not be stepping in to pay for the cost of the Solus cards, which cost about £12 each.

There are an estimated 660,000 digital satellite box owners currently using Solus cards, which means the BBC has spent nearly £8m since BSkyB launched its digital satellite service in 1998.

To get the advertiser-funded free services in the future, digital satellite viewers will either have to pay for a Sky Digital subscription or switch back to the analogue terrestrial signal they receive via an aerial.

"Solus cards are distributed by Sky on fair, reasonable and non-discriminatory terms as part of our conditional access commitment," a BSkyB spokesman said.

"If another terrestrial broadcaster wishes to take up funding the cards, Sky will continue to distribute them," he added.

BSkyB is also in the process of sending out upgraded encryption cards to all its customers and phasing out the current generation, including the Solus cards.

"No date has been set [for the switchover to the new cards], but we are in the process of sending out the new ones," the BSkyB spokesman said.

So within a few months the 660,000 digital satellite box owners who currently watch free-to-air channels with a Solus card will also lose the ITV services, Channel 4 and Five.

Last month the independent television commission chief executive, Patricia Hodgson, predicted the BBC's "in the clear" move would revolutionise the UK broadcasting landscape, creating a free-to-air alternative on digital satellite to BSkyB's subscription offering.

But it now looks as if the Solus card issue has rendered this prediction premature.

Digital satellite viewers wanting to see ITV, Channel 4 and Five may have to wait until these broadcasters renegotiate their encryption deals with BSkyB in the coming years if they decide to follow the BBC and go in the clear.

Five renewed its digital satellite encryption deal only last week.
it good to know that but couldyou plz tell us the satellite and its path so we check it out.
 

Analoguesat

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#3
Ideal_18 said:
it good to know that but couldyou plz tell us the satellite and its path so we check it out.
This news is over 2 years old - why have you reseurrected it?? :rolleyes: :-doh! The BBC broadcasts in the clear off Astra 2D at 28E. If you are in Pakistan as your profile suggests, you have absolutely NO CHANCE WHATSOEVER of getting the BBC channels.
 
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#5
Ideal_18 said:
it good to know that but couldyou plz tell us the satellite and its path so we check it out.
sorry basicly i think that is the new one becoz i receive the email from the fourm:(
 

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#6
If you want to discuss this any further please start a new thread for it, continuing this one is just going to confuse more people. :)
 
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