• This site uses cookies. By continuing to use this site, you are agreeing to our use of cookies. Learn more.

Government looks at relaxing dish laws

N

net1

Guest
#1
If you live in a conservation area, national park, listed building or other restricted location you have to apply for planning permission to put up a dish. The reality is it costs you around £110 to find out if you are able to - and in many places you are not.

The rules are governed by the 1996 Town and County (General Permitted Development) Order which gives general permissions and rules for satellite dishes. This looks like it might be replaced after a paper was issued by the Office of the Deputy Prime Minister which puts a number of choices out to consultation from maintaining the status quo to scrapping virtually all the rules. The paper goes on to says that the current rules are "unnecessarily restrictive".

One of the reasons to relax the rules is to ensure the switch off of analogue can happen sooner. In some areas a satellite dish is the only cost effective solution for both the home-owner and the broadcasters.
 

rolfw

Believe it when I see it Admin.
Staff member
Messages
37,652
Likes
1,272
My Satellite Setup
See signature
My Location
Berkshire
#2
Certainly along with many other members, I have always found it absurd that it was possible in certain circumstances to erect a huge array of terrestrial TV antennas, but require planning consent for a relatively small satellite dish, about time it was reconsidered.
 

rolfw

Believe it when I see it Admin.
Staff member
Messages
37,652
Likes
1,272
My Satellite Setup
See signature
My Location
Berkshire
#3
So what does everybody else think, are the UK planning laws anti satellite/anti human rights, what are the rules like in other countries where our members may live ?
 

Channel Hopper

Suffering fools, so you don't have to.
Staff member
Messages
24,283
Likes
5,183
My Satellite Setup
A little less analogue, and a lot more crap.
My Location
UK South
#4
For the UK, rules in place that restrict to 90cm are outdated and should have been revised years ago

I can understand the need to ensure equipment is fitted in the least obtrusve place, as well as prevent a building from becoming a breeding place for satellite dishes, but the existing rules fail in that there is no need for the installer to fit bracketry, mount, bolts and even the dish in a way that will withstand the worst of the UK weather.

The quality of outdoor equipment supplied nowadays also leaves a lot to be desired, and any revision of laws should make reference to te 'fit for the purpose' for the work carried out by the installation company, as well as those within the equipment descriptions.
 

mikeey

Kalashnikov Poster
Messages
308
Likes
0
#5
CHANNELL HOPPER I HAVE ALWAYS SAID THAT U AND ROLF

SHOULD BE THE PM OF GREAT BRITAIN.

ALL THE BEST

MIKEEY
 
N

net1

Guest
#6
A consultation document, from the Office of the Deputy Prime Minister, reviews five options for the public to comment on. These range from retaining the restrictions on satellite dishes to abolishing almost all of them. The ODPM said that the 1995 regulations meant that many households could not have satellite television.

The most contentious would lift restrictions placed on dish installations by some of the UK's National Parks. This has led to the anomaly of householders in some of the most remote and mountainous areas of Britain having to build virtual masts to receive terrestrial TV while a 65cm satellite dish is prohibited! Other rules limit the installation of the normal 45cm Sky mini-dish on listed buildings and within Conservation Areas. These could be lifted completely or considerably lightened.

The proposals also consider the use of bigger dishes, up to 100cm and multiple dishes on the same dwelling. The paper follows lobbying from groups who claimed dishes were an eyesore, and that the current rules are "unnecessarily restrictive and limit consumer choice".

A spokesman for the ODPM said "The rules and regulations are quite strict and we are looking at whether they should be freed up. One of the things which we are looking at is equality of access." The Government is keen to encourage 'discreet installation' with dishes disguised by paint-effect to make them look like roof tiles or a half-timbered wall!

Relaxing the rules would be seen as another stage in the Government's strategy of encouraging digital satellite as the 'final link' for digital take-up in remote areas unlikely to be served by DTT. Allowing dishes up to 100cm, would open up the satellite market to platforms other than the combination of Sky and Astra.