Grounding the antenna distribution

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My "distribution system" consists of a variety of splitters, combiners, and DiSEqC swtiches.
The signal path carries SAT signals from (currently) three dishes,, cable TV, and terrestrial.
I have a strong urge to gound the whole thing, primarily to pull down any DC to same base level.
I have noticed that some equipment get uhappy after a while, and then need a "cooling off" period, especially when the SAT stuff has been connected to the CATV things.

QUESTION: Should I go the full length and hammer in a new ground stake, pull grounding cable etc, OR can I use the grounding stake and connector of the *electrical* installation, which is situated right next to the distribution system? Ground is ground, I would think, but should I now mix electrical and signal ground??

(I know, I know, each country has a different electrical code of conduct and installation; but this should be applicable to all installations)
 

rolfw

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The main system ground should be fine, that's what we do on communal systems.
 

satelliteman

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Yep, just connect up with a 6mm earth to that.

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Terryl

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I always do a separate earth ground on satellite systems, it picks up less AC service line junk noise that way.

An outdoor metal cold water pipe, or a ground ros as close to the main dish or switch would do nicely, use 12 gauge copper wire as the ground (or larger), I ground the dish, then run to the switch (if used) and then to the earth ground, but all ground wires should go to one point, and not several different ground points. Like one to the main AC service ground and one to a ground rod or water pipe, that could cause a ground loop problem.

And if you in a lighting prone area, an inline gas discharge device should be used, as just using a ground block will only ground the shield of the coax and not protect the center conductor.

I try an put the earth ground right where the coax will go inside the building, then the gas discharge device will be the last thing before the coax enters the building, and it will have the shortest path to the ground.

But remember, if you are hit by a direct lighting hit not much can save your equipment, this is why I also use a UPS system that has an attached equipment warranty*, this way if your stuff gets zapped you covered for new stuff.

*Check out Triplte UPS systems.
 
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Ok, thanks for the advice.
I will try the AC mains ground first, as the AC mains ground is right next to the installation.
Don't think ligtning strike is an issue, the dishes and the hours are by far not the highest point in the surroundings.
There plenty of regular antennas, flag poles, and most of all tall trees surrounding us.
 

Terryl

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Well the thing about lightning is that it hits what ever it feels like.

Just be sure the the ground connections are nice and tight, and don't mix conductor types, if the main AC ground is an aluminum conductor then you will have to use aluminum 10 gauge wire, if copper then use copper 12 gauge wire, and be sure its a green colored wire.
 
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Well the thing about lightning is that it hits what ever it feels like.

Just be sure the the ground connections are nice and tight, and don't mix conductor types, if the main AC ground is an aluminum conductor then you will have to use aluminum 10 gauge wire, if copper then use copper 12 gauge wire, and be sure its a green colored wire.
Will do.
(Really apprciate your detailed advice - that's what makes a difference).
 
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