Cryosat launch coverage

Analoguesat

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#1
ESA's ice investigation satellite Cryosat will be launched this afternoon. Coverage will be carried on ESA TV on Astra 1 (12552 V) Theres a test card running at the moment saying coverage starts at 1620 cest (1520 uk summer time)

Its actual launch and climbout is almost certain to be taken on Euronews (Sky 528) around 1600 uk time
 

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#2
Ah a nice launch. Shame it disappeared into the clouds so early though...
 

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#3
Sadly its starting to look like the mission is a failure. The ground stations failed to get any signals off either Cryosat or the Brieze final stage on the expected first pass.

Whilst this isnt indicative of a total failure at the moment, you have to say its not looking good at the moment
 

gameboy

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#4
Analoguesat said:
Sadly its starting to look like the mission is a failure.
Europe ice satellite feared lost

BBC report
here...
 

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#5
Cryosat confirmed lost :(

CryoSat Mission lost due to launch failure


8 October 2005
Today at 21.00 CEST Mr Yuri Bakhvalov, First Deputy Director General of the Khrunichev Space Centre on behalf of the Russian State Commission officially confirmed that the launch of CryoSat ended in a failure due to an anomaly in the launch sequence and expressed his regret to ESA and all partners involved.

Preliminary analysis of the telemetry data indicates that the first stage performed nominally. The second stage performed nominally until main engine cut-off was to occur. Due to a missing command from the onboard flight control system the main engine continued to operate until depletion of the remaining fuel.
As a consequence, the separation of the second stage from upper stage did not occur. Thus, the combined stack of the two stages and the CryoSat satellite fell into the nominal drop zone north of Greenland close to the North Pole into high seas with no consequences to populated areas.

An investigating commission by the Russian State authorities has been established to further analyze the reasons for the failure, results are expected within the next weeks. This commission will work in close cooperation with a failure investigation board consisting of Eurockot, ESA and Khrunichev representatives.

This information is released at the same time by Eurockot and ESA
 

gameboy

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#6
The European Space Agency is considering rebuilding its lost CryoSat satellite, which crashed into the Arctic Ocean on Saturday after the failure of its launch vehicle.

CryoSat was designed to measure the thickness of polar ice sheets and floating sea ice to an unprecedented level of accuracy, providing valuable new data to climate scientists. But it was lost when its Rockot launcher, built by a German and Russian joint venture called Eurockot, failed shortly after launch from the Plesetsk cosmodrome in north-west Russia.

The problem appears to lie with the rocket's second stage. It failed to shut off as planned and did not separate from the vehicle's upper stage, causing the satellite and conjoined stages to splash into the ocean north of Greenland.

Russia, ESA and Eurockot are investigating the cause of the failure.

But ESA is already considering a replacement mission. "We're looking into this option seriously in order to please the worldwide science community," says ESA spokesperson Simonetta Cheli.

Money will be a key factor in the decision to rebuild. The original mission cost €136 million, which included the development of the €70 million satellite, ground support, the launch and operations for three years. But Volker Liebig, the director of ESA's Earth Observation programme, says: "A clone of the original CryoSat should be less expensive."

Tight schedule

ESA is negotiating with industry to estimate the cost of building a clone and talking to Eurockot about launching it at a reduced fee. But any replacement must also be authorised by ESA's member states, which provide money for particular missions.

If CryoSat II gets that support, Liebig estimates the mission would take three years to launch. "The design phase has been done once and we would only have to go through manufacturing and testing," he says.

Such a tight schedule is feasible if no changes are made to the mission design, says ESA's Don McCoy. He is the project manager for Venus Express, which ESA developed in three years and based on its existing Mars Express spacecraft.

"They won't have much flexibility," McCoy told New Scientist. "The basic building of the instruments takes a certain amount of time, and then you need to test everything together in the spacecraft."

Cutting edge

The downside of simply cloning the original is that the second satellite cannot take advantage of any technological advances developed since the first mission was designed. But McCoy says: "If they have an instrument that hasn't flown and isn't planned to be flown by anybody else in the future, it is still cutting edge for applications in space."

Liebig suggests this is the case, as CryoSat carries different instruments than NASA's IceSat satellite, which launched into orbit in January 2003. IceSat uses a laser to measure the topography of ice at the poles, while CryoSat was to employ a highly precise radar altimeter to measure ice thickness.

If a second CryoSat mission were launched, it would be the latest in a series of repeats undertaken by both ESA and NASA. In 2000, ESA successfully launched its Cluster II mission aboard two Soyuz rockets - a group of four spacecraft designed to study the magnetic environment around Earth. The original group had been destroyed in 1996 when their Ariane 5 launcher broke apart 37 seconds after liftoff.

And NASA is planning to launch its Phoenix probe to the Red Planet in 2007. Phoenix uses instruments from the agency's Mars Polar Lander, which crashed onto the planet in 1999.
 

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#7
gameboy said:
And NASA is planning to launch its Phoenix probe to the Red Planet in 2007. Phoenix uses instruments from the agency's Mars Polar Lander, which crashed onto the planet in 1999.
Have they sent someone to go and fetch the less bent ones?? :D
 
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#8
It's quite obviously the Great Galactic Ghoul, which this time left NASA alone, and "chomped at" a few European things instead (for a more varied diet!).

See: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Galactic_Ghoul .

(googling "great galactic ghoul" will get other stuff!).
 
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