How to fit an F type satellite compression connector to coax cable.

This tutorial on how to fit a F type satellite compression connector to coax cable, something that is asked on a regular basis here at Sats UK.

  • First Strip back the cable, about 1/4 inch core and 1/4 inch dialectric.


  • Next fold back the outer braid, with some F connectors you may need to remove the foil shield, but others will be fine with it in place.


  • Push on the F connector with the braid still pulled back over the outer, Tip a warm cable makes it easier.
    (If you have a screw on type “F” Connector, simply screw the F connector onto the coax cable until the dialectic foam core touches the end of the connector barrel)


  • Then insert the cable into the crimping tool and crimp.


  • Your finished satellite F connector should look like this.-


If you require more help please visit our satellite TV support forum Here
 

Comments

dreamsat1
Hello chris,
The foil should definitely stay on the dielectric. In your variant, the return loss and the shielding worsened.
The press plug has dan only mechanical sense.


regards dreamsat
 

Attachments

PaulR
In practice I find (with screw-on plugs) that the foil cracks away and has to be removed to simply tidy up the installation. I can't see how the return loss or shielding would be worsened as the whole of the end of the cable will be enclosed by the plug.

This is using WF100 with copper foil so aluminium foil may be less prone to cracking however I still wouldn't worry about it.
 
dreamsat1
I'm sorry that I wrote something about it. I just thought that a faulty assembly instruction is visible to everyone, not so good. Of course, anyone can mount his plug as he pleases.
@PaulR: A screwed plug has a shield of max. 75dB. If you remove everything from the dielectric, you have a weak spot there. Then you do not need a cable with 100 and more dB shielding. With the increasing number of LTE frequencies, interference can quickly occur.
If you do not like this well-meant hint, delete my posts on this topic.

regards dreamsat
 
PaulR
I don't see any reason to delete the post. I was really just pointing out how, in practice, the copper foil tears and then has to be removed anyway.
 
jeallen01
Ref the copper foil shielding, I have found that that in genuine Webro WF100 is reasonably flexible, whereas that in some generally similar CT100 (notably, Farnell's own brand stuff ) is rather more brittle and cracks easily (and so I won't use that anymore).
Another issue is that with many screw-on connectors, the inner barrel can be too narrow to allow the dielectric to enter with the foil still on it.
 
P
Hi a comment for what it is worth. I have used both types of F connectors and whilst the compression type is the commercially accepted product screw on items with the following" addition" are more simple for amateur use. The "addition" prior to screwing on the F connector to the co-ax; pass two lengths of shrink sleeve first.

Then screw on the F connector. Add a small amount of sealant at the point where the F connector meets the co-ax outer sleeve and pass the first shrink sleeve over the sealant and over the knurled part of the F connector. Apply heat CAREFULLY to secure the sleeve.

You have a choice with the 2nd piece of shrink sleeve.(1) After locking the F connector to whatever (LNB?) add some more silicone seal to the F connector and item socket (LNB ) pass the 2nd sleeve over the first and the connector nut. Secure with a tie wrap i. e. do not shrink it ..OR... CAREFULLY heat the 2nd sleeve. This applies where the item has lost; if it ever had, a rubber boot!!

Regards Punjetas
 
Channel Hopper
Hi a comment for what it is worth. I have used both types of F connectors and whilst the compression type is the commercially accepted product screw on items with the following" addition" are more simple for amateur use. The "addition" prior to screwing on the F connector to the co-ax; pass two lengths of shrink sleeve first.

Then screw on the F connector. Add a small amount of sealant at the point where the F connector meets the co-ax outer sleeve and pass the first shrink sleeve over the sealant and over the knurled part of the F connector. Apply heat CAREFULLY to secure the sleeve.

You have a choice with the 2nd piece of shrink sleeve.(1) After locking the F connector to whatever (LNB?) add some more silicone seal to the F connector and item socket (LNB ) pass the 2nd sleeve over the first and the connector nut. Secure with a tie wrap i. e. do not shrink it ..OR... CAREFULLY heat the 2nd sleeve. This applies where the item has lost; if it ever had, a rubber boot!!

Regards Punjetas
Very few heat shrink brands are UV resistant, which is why it is not normally used in outdoor environments.
 
Terryl
We use a special brand of heat shrink tubing in the RF antenna world, it is UV resistant and it has a sealant inside it that is heat activated, once it is heated up to the correct temp the sealant will flow around the coax connector and the heat shrink will compress it around the connector and what ever antenna connector is exposed.

I do not recommend the use of this type if your going to be removing the LNB or what ever your trying to seal up anytime soon as it is very difficult to do so with this type of heat shrink.

If the connections are outside and exposed to the weather a small dab of coax rated dielectric grease should be used, do not use the stuff that they sell for the auto light bulbs and auto connectors, that stuff will attack the coaxes center insulation and you will have some problems, it will also travel down the inside of the coax.

The grease that is rated for RF coax is called "STUF" you can find it on Amazon.
 
Channel Hopper
Somewhere on this forum there will be an advocate of self-amalgamating tape.
 
jeallen01
And then there is "liquid electrical tape", as mentioned some time ago by @RustySpoons - tried the bottle & brush version, but now prefer the aerosol version version which is (MHO) easier and more precise to use (and doesn't "go off" like the bottled version does if the top is not firmly screwed on), and then very easy to remove if needs be. Especially good around connectors on a multiway DiSEqC switch like my 16-1 version.
 
P
Hi Terryl, Channel Hopper and jeallen01. Thank you for your replies. Terryl's info; is interesting. I have used preformed sheaths of the tubing for making off multi wired cables to plugs. I'll look up STUF on Amazon. True, one needs to be careful which sealant you use........ Yes, Channel Hopper amalgamating tape has proved it's worth before shrink tubing was available. No doubt it still has its uses today, as the wholesaler I buy from, sells it ......jeallen01 Thanks I'll look into the product you mention. If it has an ISO or other spec it could be useful. My original comment was derived from recently removing RG 6 cable from and underground pipe "sealed" 10 years ago in our garden. Water poured out of the pipe! The RG 6 and other control cables with it, were for a Jaeger H to H unit. I'm upgrading RG 6 to Labgear PF 100 and it will not be buried underground, even if so rated. On the subject of UV deterioration, tie wraps as you probably know, are subject to the same rules. Commercial projects apart; has anyone evidence of cable products failing in the UK due to UV? Best regards John
 
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