Advice Needed Multiswitches: Passive vs Active Terrestrial?

dssnosher

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In lamest terms, can someone please explain the different between the two when it comes to multiswitches? I am looking at EMP switches 5/8 and there are both types available. How do I figure out which one I need?
 
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A nonymous

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If what you are referring to is a distribution multi switch its basically 5 inputs and 8 Outputs. I assume by active or passive you mean amplified or non amplified.

Inputs

1 x Terrestrial ( UHF-DVB-T /FM/DAB ) - (ATSC in Canada instead of DVB-T)

1 x DVB-S Vertical Low
1 x DVB-S Vertical High
1 x DVB-S Horizontal Low
1 x DVB-S Horizontal High

Outputs

8 Satellite feeds with the terrestrial signal combined to each feed which can be de-combined using a sat/Tv wall plate.

As there is no Circular polarity signals broadcast into Europe i am not 100% sure how well a linear polarity multiswitch would work with a multi switch as i have never tried, although i hope to in the not to distant future. I should imagine the switch will see the L/H and R/H signal as it would a vertical or horizontal signal. I shouldn't imagine any issues with North Americas DSS satellite standard either.

The switch will basically act like an LNB. The receiver will not know any difference, as far as its concerned it is connected to an lnb.

As for what you need is a difficult one without more info. A lot of the time it is dependent on the power of the original signal from the dish and aerial signal and how far the run is from the switch to the receiver as to whether it needs amplifying or not. Too strong a signal can cause just as many issues as a weak signal.

You also need to know if you can get away with a receiver powered switch like the Triax TMPR 5x8 which takes its power from the satellite receivers connected to it or whether you need a switch that has its own individual power source like a Triax TMP 5x8

Nano
 

satelliteman

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Passive will give you a loss on the terrestrial path. Active will be a gain or no loss, typically 1-5dB depending on switch manufacture.
 

dssnosher

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What would be my switch options for getting Intelsat 20? I understand it only uses 2 output C band LNB?
 

PaulR

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Two guesses!

1) An active terrestrial might be able to supply power up the terrestrial input to power an aerial amplifier.

2) It isn't anything terrestrial that's passive at all but the multiswitch itslef. These do exist and take all the power they need from the satellite receivers connected to them - i.e. they don't need a separate power supply.
 

satelliteman

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Two guesses!

1) An active terrestrial might be able to supply power up the terrestrial input to power an aerial amplifier.

2) It isn't anything terrestrial that's passive at all but the multiswitch itslef. These do exist and take all the power they need from the satellite receivers connected to them - i.e. they don't need a separate power supply.

That's DC powered switches.
Some mains switches will supply line power on the Terr path.

Passive or active terrestrial refers to the loss or gain of the terrestrial path on the switch.
 
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