New UK Dish Planning Guidelines

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rolfw

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Here are the updated guidelines.

Office of the Deputy Prime Minister said:
4. It is a condition of installing an antenna under both the current and revised regulations that it be sited in such a way so that it minimises its impact on the external appearance of the building. Furthermore, antennas no longer need for reception or transmission purposes should be removed as soon as practicable.

Dwelling Houses and Buildings under 15m
5. Under the revised planning regulations for dwelling houses and buildings under 15m:
* two antennas will be permitted;
* the size of the antennas will be restricted:
* the larger having a maximum of 100 cm in any linear direction and 35 litres cubic capacity by volume;
* the smaller having a maximum of 60 cm and 35 litres cubic capacity by volume;
* chimney-mounted antennas will also restricted to a maximum of 60 cm and 35 litres cubic capacity by volume.
* the antennas will have certain siting restrictions:
* no antenna should protrude above the roof if the premises does not have a protruding chimney;
* if the premises has a protruding chimney, antennas may protrude up to 60 cm above the roof, or up to height of the chimney, whichever is the lower.


Buildings above 15m in height
6. We do not propose to modify the permitted development rights that apply to these buildings significantly. Under the revised planning regulations:
* The number of antennas will be limited to four;
* The size of the antennas will be restricted to 130cm in any linear direction and, up to 35 litres cubic capacity by volume;
* chimney-mounted antennas will be limited to 60 cm and up to 35 litres cubic capacity by volume.
* The antennas will have certain siting restrictions:
* antennas should not exceed the highest part of the roof by more than 300cm.


Designated Areas
7. The regulations for designated areas are more restrictive. Designated areas are those listed under Article 1(5) of Schedule 1 of the Town and Country Planning (General Permitted Development Order) 1995 (the GPDO). These areas are: the National Parks; Areas of Outstanding Natural Beauty; conservation areas, and the Norfolk and Suffolk Broads. In these areas, as well as the number, size, and siting restrictions made according to the height of the building, antennas should not be both facing and visible from a road or a broads waterway.

8. If a local planning authority considers an antenna is poorly sited and could reasonably be positioned less conspicuously, they can ask the owner to re-site the antenna at their own expense. If such a request is refused, the planning authority may then require an application for planning permission for which a charge is payable, or serve the householder with an enforcement notice requiring the siting of the antenna to be altered in a specified way.

9. Listed buildings will still need full listed building consent to install antenna including satellite dishes.

10. The changes apply to England only. The Scottish Executive, the Welsh Assembly and Northern Ireland Planning Service have consulted on similar changes in 2003 and 2004 but have not announced any changes.
 

rolfw

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#2
Planning Portal - Application required?

Houses and buildings up to 15 metres high


Unless your house (or the building in which you live) is in a designated area, you do not need to apply for planning permission to install an antenna on your property, as long as:

* there will be no more than two antennas on the property overall. (These may be on the front or back of the building, on the roof, attached to the chimney, or in the garden);
* if you are installing a single antenna, it is not more than 100 centimetres in any linear dimension (b) (not including any projecting feed element (c), reinforcing rim, mounting and brackets);
* if you are installing two antennas, one is not more than 100 centimetres in any linear dimension, and the other is not more than 60 centimetres in any linear dimension (not including any projecting feed element, reinforcing rim, mounting and brackets);
* the cubic capacity (d) of each individual antenna is not more than 35 litres;
* an antenna fitted onto a chimney stack is not more than 60 centimetres in any linear dimension; and
* an antenna mounted on the roof only sticks out above the roof when there is a chimney-stack. In this case, the antenna should not stick out more than 60 centimetres above the highest part of the roof, or above the highest part of the chimney stack, whichever is lower.

b. Linear dimension: This means taking the measurement in a straight line, starting from the edge of the antenna to the opposite edge of the antenna. The measurement should only include the antenna itself and not any attachment needed to fix it to the wall or roof, or connect it up to your equipment.

c. Projecting feed element: In a dish antenna, the incoming signals are received by the dish which then ‘reflects’ the signal into a central ‘feed horn’. This is usually positioned at a short distance (a few inches) away from the dish and held in place by projecting arm or arms.

d. cubic capacity: This means the volume (the amount of in 3 dimensions) occupied by an object using known method of measurement.


Houses and buildings up to 15 metres high in designated areas

If your house (or the building in which you live) is in a designated area, you do not need to apply for planning permission to install an antenna on your property, as long as:

* there will be no more than two antennas on the property overall;
* if you are installing a single antenna, it is not be more than 100 centimetres in any linear dimension (not including any projecting feed element, reinforcing rim, mounting and brackets);
* if you are installing two antennas, one is not more than 100 centimetres in any linear dimension, and the other is not more than 60 centimetres in any linear dimension (not including any projecting feed element, reinforcing rim, mounting and brackets);
* the cubic capacity of each individual antenna is not more than 35 litres;
* an antenna fitted onto a chimney stack is not more than 60 centimetres in any linear dimension;
* an antenna mounted on the roof only sticks out above the roof when there is a chimney-stack. In this case, the antenna should not stick out more than 60 centimetres above the highest part of the roof, or above the highest part of the chimney stack, whichever is lower; and
* an antenna is not installed on a chimney, wall, or a roof slope which faces onto, and is visible from, a road or a Broads waterway. (If you are not sure, get advice from the local planning authority.)


Buildings 15m or more in height

Unless your building is in a designated area, you do not need to apply for planning permission to install a dish or other antenna on your property, as long as:

* there will be no more than four antennas on the building overall;
* the size of any antenna is not more than 130 centimetres in any linear dimension (not including any projecting feed element, reinforcing rim, mounting and brackets);
* the cubic capacity of each individual antenna is not more than 35 litres;
* an antenna fitted onto a chimney stack is not more than 60 centimetres in any linear dimension; and
* an antenna mounted on the roof does not stick out above the roof more than 300 centimetres above the highest part of the roof.

Good Practice for installation of dishes
 
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